RGV Families Uncertain after Trump Administration Rescinds DAPA

Posted: Updated:

WESLACO – A proposed program aimed at keeping families from being split apart through deportation is no more.

The Department of Homeland Security announced Friday they’ve revoked the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans Program (DAPA).

The program was never fully launched. It was introduced in November of 2014 under the Obama Administration as a way to protect undocumented parents of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents.

Norma Aldape is a mother of six. She said she does not have legal documents and she’s worried about the future of her family.

“We had a hope. We didn't know if it was going to be approved but it’s still sad to know that we have to start from zero,” she said.

Attorney Lionel Perez told CHANNEL 5 NEWS he represents clients like Aldape.

"Anybody who doesn't have documents is fair game right now. It doesn't make a difference if you're a criminal or if you've been here for 20 years and you have all your family here,” he explained. “They’re going to treat you all the same. They’re going to arrest you and take you beyond a judge if necessary."

Perez said DAPA would have allowed parents in the country without their legal documents to get a renewable work permit. Without that, he said their future is in question.

"The hope is gone, the people will remain in limbo just like they were before the order of November 2014,” he said..

When DAPA was first announced, Texas and 26 other states filed a lawsuit questioning its legality.

“We have to press on,” said Aldape. “Now, we live in fear, but we have faith. We also can't hold our children back. They need to go out and go to school, go to classes, go to college.”

While DAPA is off the table, The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program is still in place. The program allows children who were brought into the U.S. illegally relief from deportation.

Para leer noticias en español, visite nuestra sección Español.
CURRENT CONDITIONS
/