Bluetown Farmer's Concerns About Trespassers Continue

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BLUETOWN – Robert Martinez, a Bluetown farmer, says people crossing the U.S. illegally often trespass through his property on their journey north.

The small town sits along the edge of the Rio Grande in Cameron County.

Martinez says immigrants may hide in the canal adjacent to his house. 

"They come at night," he tells CHANNEL 5NEWS. "No longer do they come there in the day."

We told you Martinez was constructing his own makeshift border barricades. He's using a boat filled with logs and tractor equipment to deter foot traffic and keep vehicles out.

He says it's still necessary.

"So they won't go by," says Martinez. "They're not going to ask me for permission to go down the road because they're trafficking."

In 2016, he showed us articles of clothing left behind by passing immigrants. Today, he tells the encounters are more unsettling.

"They pulled my doors several times in the front and in the back of the house to come in and use the phone," he says. "And nobody comes in my home without being invited in."

Martinez is willing to protect his home. He tells us he wants more U.S. Border Patrol agents in the area.

"You don't see any Border Patrol. I don't know where the heck the Border Patrol is,” he says.

We reached out to U.S. Customs and Border Protection to ask about agents in the Bluetown area. They say they are patrolling but could not comment on where agents are deployed along the border.

Martinez says, for now, he added more lights to his property to get a better view of what’s happening on his property.

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