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Mass shootings create rippling network of stricken survivors

1 year 4 months 2 weeks ago Sunday, June 02 2019 Jun 2, 2019 June 02, 2019 7:17 AM June 02, 2019 in News - AP Texas Headlines

By SHARON COHEN and LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press

CHICAGO (AP) - The litany of mass shootings in recent years has changed how America talks, prays and prepares for trouble.

Today, the phrases "active shooter" and "shelter in place" need no explanation. A house of worship may have an armed guard. More schools are holding "lockdown drills" to prepare students for the possibility of a shooter. And some police and firefighters haunted by memories of carnage they've witnessed are seeking psychological help.

While support groups of survivors of mass shootings have formed, mayors, police, doctors and others who've endured these crises are paying it forward - offering comfort, advice and mentoring to the next town that has to wrestle with the nightmare. The National Center for PTSD estimates 28 percent of people who've witnessed a mass shooting develop post-traumatic stress disorder.

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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